The Target Operating Model at the heart of our Cloud Governance framework is centered around a Cloud Team named the Cloud Center of Expertise. It is nestled in between Demand and Delivery parties at both ends of the IT value chain. Within the organization its main purpose is to increase the cloud maturity of the organization.  

Increase the cloud maturity of your organization.

The Cloud Center of Expertise focuses on the knowledge development of the entire organization on the topic of cloud. Both the role of the business itself and well thought out demand management and supply management are crucial. The internal management of organizations is often insufficiently developed and adjusted when organizations opt for cloud.

There are two types of Cloud Centers of Expertise: Advisory and Prescriptive ones. The advisory type is suited for organizations with a somewhat higher level of maturity. For this Cloud Center interactions are defined between roles, with other processes and the use of technology. We assume that you already have an IT operating model in place hence the prefix ‘Target’. The Target Operating Model is a Future Mode of Operations. The Cloud Center of Expertise is a way to mature an IT organization incrementally, not everything has to be a 5 out of 5 from the start. Choosing to set up a competence center for cloud can also be a good kick in the backside to start training and/or recruiting the personnel to build up the necessary knowledge.  

Building blocks for cloud governance
Platform Design Enterprise Architecture Alignment Service & Tooling Integration Reference Architecture Maintenance Application & Platform Monitoring Event Monitoring & Incident Management Provisioning & Configuration Management Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery Change Management Configuration and Asset Management Change Management Identity & Access Management Capacity Planning and Forecasting Financial Management and Cost Optimization Continuous Improvement Capabilites Organization Cloud Center of Expertise Roles Event Monitoring and Incident Management Gateway to Vendor Support Knowledge Exchange Vendor Portfolio Alignment Compliance and risk Configuration and Asset Management Financial Reporting and Forecasting

Platform Design

Enterprise Architecture Alignment

Service & Tooling Integration

Reference Architecture Maintenance

Application & Platform Monitoring

Event Monitoring & Incident Management

Provisioning & Configuration Management

Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery

Change Management

Configuration and Asset Management

Change Management

Identity & Access Management

Capacity Planning and Forecasting

Financial Management and Cost Optimization

Continuous Improvement

Capabilites

These are the core capabilities as provided by the framework

Organization

The left side of the framework focuses on supporting the business with the optimal use of cloud technology while the right side focuses on the safe and secure usage of cloud

Cloud Center of Expertise Roles

Event Monitoring and Incident Management

Gateway to Vendor Support

Knowledge Exchange

Vendor Portfolio Alignment

Compliance and risk

Configuration and Asset Management

Financial Reporting and Forecasting

The building blocks of the target operating model are intended as ‘to address’ items. Certainly not intended to mean that all tasks and processes in the Target Operating Model are placed under the responsibility of the CCoE. Some processes simply remain at the higher level (for example: Financial Management).

Capabilities
Capabilities represent a grouping of specific tasks and processes for the CCoE. The columns in grey on both sides represent interfaces to roles and processes that are closely aligned.

Tasks and Processes
Every ’tile’ in this model represents a task or activity. Sometimes it’s an existing IT(IL) process that we need to redesign, other times it’s a task to support other roles or teams. The ’tiles’ are explained in detail here. [link naar artikel] When designing a Target Operating Model you will have to adjust for local changes. The ways of your organization will result in different or added tasks and processes for which to define actions and interfaces.

To reiterate; it is not the intention for all tasks and processes in the Target Operating Model to be placed under the responsibility of the CCoE.

Roles
The roles of the CCoE is a subject unto its own. Read more about it here.

The CCoE is divided into two parts.

Left Brain, Right Brain
The CCoE is divided into two parts. A left and right side of the brain if you wil.

The left side is in support of the Plan and Build phases of the Cloud Service Lifecycle (Plan, Build, Run, Retire. [Source: opengroup.org]). The actual transition to cloud services is a complex project that requires a lot of specific cloud knowledge. The exchange and application of that knowledge is an important task of the left brain. They will have to get up on a pulpit and propagate the gospel of cloud. The pulpit is mainly metaphoric of course, there are a lot of ways to evangelize like training and pizza sessions, Knowledge Exchange Fairs, Hack-a-thons, etc etc..  

It is also possible to map the left side to the Business e.g. the Demand side of the IT value chain. Service Design, Information Management, integration solutions, cloud architecture, etc. all find a home on this side.  

The right side is in support of the Run and Retire phases of the Cloud Service Lifecycle (Plan, Build, Run, Retire. [Source: opengroup.org]). Here we aid in redesiging existing IT(IL) service delivery processes to suit the needs of cloud services by using policy-based automation and creating blue prints and application scripts for configurations. Also on the right side we are supporting  business processes in a broader scope through cloud data analysis and by presenting those insights through dashboards and reports.  

For the right side it is also possible to map it to suppliers of services (internal/external) e.g. the Delivery side of the IT value chain. Managing external parties and services is an important added value activity within the IT value chain.  

Leave a Reply

Close Menu